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A Chat With Charlie Brooker

Podcast #15 is here, with a special guest in tow. Charlie Brooker settles in for a nice, long interview on the hottest day of 2011. We talk about his career, from its beginnings, when he would fire off submissions to Oink! comic at the age of sixteen, right through to what he’s got lined up next.

Also under discussion: what it’s like to transition from journalist, to presenter, to performer; the symphony of nodding heads that is Twitter and the hitherto unexamined power that cameramen can hold over comedians.

Hope you enjoy it, and many thanks to Charlie for being so generous with his time.

Follow me on Twitter at @cookdandbombd and keep up-to-date with comedy news and discussion with @ComedyChat.

Update: You can now listen to this on YouTube – skip to a minute in to jump past the podcast intro:

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7 Responses

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  1. James Henry says

    Excellent, looking forward to hearing this, thanks!

  2. James Henry says

    Can I be a tosser and point out you don’t need an apostrophe in the “it’s” in “it’s beginnings” there.

    *hates self*

    • Neil says

      Oops, thanks, appreciate the correction.

    • Maladjustedduck says

      Permission granted.

  3. Dr David Lewindon says

    Modal undo doh!

Continuing the Discussion

  1. Comedians using their fans for coordinated, safetyinnumbers bullying – Cook'd and Bomb'd Comedy Chat linked to this post on September 5, 2012

    [...] abuse, which has been covered on this blog before, in my podcast interviews with Jonnie Marbles and Charlie Brooker. It’s unpleasant and unnecessary, but people quickly become emboldened by the deindividuation [...]

  2. Fielding and MissSpidey | Butterflies and Wheels linked to this post on September 7, 2012

    [...] abuse, which has been covered on this blog before, in my podcast interviews with Jonnie Marbles and Charlie Brooker.  It’s unpleasant and unnecessary, but people quickly become emboldened by the deindividuation [...]



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